DCBigPappa's Blog

Politics & Pop Culture from a homocon.

Black History Month: Ella Fitzgerald


Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996) is known as the “First Lady of Song.” Over the course of her 59 year recording career, she was the winner of 13 Grammy Awards and sold over 40 million albums.   She was awarded the National Medal of Arts by Ronald Reagan and the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George H. W. Bush.

Her voice was flexible, wide-ranging, accurate and ageless. She could sing sultry ballads, sweet jazz and imitate every instrument in an orchestra. She worked with all the jazz greats, from Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Nat King Cole, to Frank Sinatra, Dizzy Gillespie and Benny Goodman. (Or rather, some might say all the jazz greats had the pleasure of working with Ella.)

Ella was born in Newport News, VA, but shortly after, her mother moved them to Yonkers, NY.

In mid 1936, Ella made her first recording. “Love and Kisses” was released under the Decca label, with moderate success.  Shortly afterward, Ella began singing a rendition of the song, “(If You Can’t Sing It) You Have to Swing It.” During this time, the era of big swing bands was shifting, and the focus was turning more toward bebop. Ella played with the new style, often using her voice to take on the role of another horn in the band. “You Have to Swing It” was one of the first times she began experimenting with scat singing, and her improvisation and vocalization thrilled fans. Throughout her career, Ella would master scat singing, turning it into a form of art.

In 1938, at the age of 21, Ella recorded a playful version of the nursery rhyme, “A-Tisket, A-Tasket.” The album sold 1 million copies, hit number one, and stayed on the pop charts for 17 weeks. Suddenly, Ella Fitzgerald was famous.

Ella also began appearing on television variety shows. She quickly became a favorite and frequent guest on numerous programs, including “The Bing Crosby Show,” “The Dinah Shore Show,” “The Frank Sinatra Show,” “The Ed Sullivan Show,” “The Tonight Show,” “The Nat King Cole Show,” “The Andy Willams Show” and “The Dean Martin Show.”

Ira Gershwin once remarked, “I never knew how good our songs were until I heard Ella Fitzgerald sing them.”

By the 1990s, Ella had recorded over 200 albums. In 1991, she gave her final concert at New York’s renowned Carnegie Hall. It was the 26th time she performed there.

On June 15, 1996, Ella Fitzgerald died in her Beverly Hills home.  Hours later, signs of remembrance began to appear all over the world.  A wreath of white flowers stood next to her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and a marquee outside the Hollywood Bowl theater read, “Ella, we will miss you.”

Some of Ella’s most memorable songs include “For Sentimental Reasons”, “I’m Beginning To See the Light”, “It’s Only a Paper Moon”, “Baby, It’s Cold Outside”, “Mack the Knife”, “Hello, Dolly!”

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